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Analyzing "Atoms of Life" by Lucia C. Stanton, (November 1991), E332.2 .A5 1991N

 Item
Identifier: id3978

Scope and Contents

The larvae of the Hessian fly (Mayetolia destructor), which destroyed wheat crops, began spreading across America from the Northeast in the late 18th and early 19th centuries (it reached Monticello around 1811 and now resides wherever wheat is grown in the United States). Jefferson took an interest in studying and stopping or eliminating the pest but, overwhelmed by political duties (and Federalist stabs at his scientific pursuits of all kinds), left Thomas Mann Randolph and Samuel L. Mitchell to carry on the fight. The remedy has remained the same for 200 years: plant late, use good fertilizer, and plow or destroy the wheat stubble.

Dates

  • E332.2 .A5 1991N

Extent

From the Collection: 74 Items

Language of Materials

From the Collection: English

Repository Details

Part of the Thomas Jefferson Foundation Archives Repository

Contact:
Jefferson Library, Thomas Jefferson Foundation
P. O. Box 316
Charlottesville VA 22902