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Observing the Health Law by Lucia Cinder Stanton, (April 1986), E332.2 .A5 1986A

 Item
Identifier: id3559

Scope and Contents

As president, Jefferson adopted, as a personal habit and model for Washington society, a manner of intentional informality. He instituted random ("convenient") seating assignments of dinner guests with the policy of "pell-mell" and passed, as a form of social legislation, the "Health Law," which banned toasting at the dinner table. In addition to stamping out an old English custom, the "Health Law" limited political conversation (and thus partisan animosity) at dinner and elicited positive responses from those who dined at Jefferson’s pleasantly casual table.

Dates

  • E332.2 .A5 1986A

Extent

From the Collection: 74 Items

Language of Materials

From the Collection: English

Repository Details

Part of the Thomas Jefferson Foundation Archives Repository

Contact:
Jefferson Library, Thomas Jefferson Foundation
P. O. Box 316
Charlottesville VA 22902